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Our last day. I had a meeting back at the WH and we wanted to take advantage of this chance to see something special in DC (besides the WH). This time I knew where I was going and traced my steps, feeling so cool. Interesting to note, the Marine Guards were not at the West Wing entrance today. That meant the President was not in residence. This time I was going from the West Wing to the Executive Offices right next door. But before we went to his office, my new friend Elias took me to the White House mess for some saltine crackers and tea. I was still nauseated and sort of embarrassed, but everyone was very solicitous. I’m definitely seeing my doctor when I get home.

IMG_4062After so many years in the desert, it was a joy to see these beautiful old office buildings with interesting tile floors, carved moldings around doors and windows  and lovely paneling. I’ve always loved this part of our country for it’s history, architecture and green landscape. I miss trees and grass.

After my meeting I dashed back to the hotel to check out. It was Dianne’s first trip to Washington so we had to see as much as possible in just a few hours. I chose the Museum of Natural History, one of the most
representative museums in DC.
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It was the right choice; she loved it from the enormous tusked elephant in the rotunda to the breathtaking stones in the gem and rock collection. The biggest disappointment was that the HOPE diamond was out for two weeks for some changes in the display area. Never mind, the other jewels were pretty spectacular.

I didn’t feel great all day but I just ignored the nausea and kept focused on all the fascinating displays at the museum, magnificent gems, awe inspiring minerals, incredible skeletons of every animal imaginable. Look at this; oh look at that! You could spend a week  there and always see something new.IMG_4077 IMG_4081 IMG_4090

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had a great time wandering around every floor. There is so much to see in our nation’s capitol and we only had a few hours but we made the most of it. Then it was on to the airport for our 5 pm flight to Phoenix.

Waiting at the airport, the nausea got worse. This was not good. Suddenly, I threw the magazines out of the plastic shopping bag, the vomiting started and I just couldn’t stop. Again that natural reaction is to be embarrassed. I couldn’t help vomiting but I kept apologizing. Why do we all do that?

Finally I asked for the EMTs and it wasn’t long before the ambulance raced over the tarmac. Oh my goodness, talk about an attention getter. Look at the pathetic vomiting sick woman. And poor Dianne was doing her best to comfort me, all the while feeling helpless.

The EMTs did the usual tests and assured me that my vitals were ok. I could travel if I felt I could manage. Stoic as ever, I was determined to make the trip so they left, lights swirling, for other emergencies. A little later, ready to board, the vomiting was back ; I knew I’d never make the flight. Back came the EMTs and off we went to the Virginia Hospital Center, that I later discovered has more awards than you can count and is a partner with Mayo Clinic. What a blessing.

In the ambulance, the EMT gave me an IV of Phenergan to stop the vomiting. It’s supposed to have a calming effect. Turns out I’m allergic to it and for almost five hours I couldn’t stop my body from moving, jerking, twisting, writhing. It was a IMG_4135terrifying feeling. They couldn’t give me an MRI or an ultrasound because I couldn’t lie still. Dianne said it was awful to watch and I could hear her crying in the background, feeling even more helpless. I wanted to cry too. In my stupor I remember thinking, Oh my goodness, I invited her to have a good time and now we’re in the ER of some strange hospital. I’m so sorry.

Finally I was out for the count and don’t remember anything else, but it was a long IMG_4134night for Dianne. The next morning I learned I’d had emergency gall bladder surgery. The surgeon couldn’t understand why I hadn’t been in terrible pain. All I’d felt was nauseous. He said after all his years of experience,
I had the biggest gall stone he’d ever seen, 5 cm. He even took a picture of it and sent it to me. It sort of reminded me of some of the minerals we’d seen at the museum. The good news was, I hadn’t thrown up in the White House.

When I felt more alert, I insisted that Dianne take the next flight home. There was nothing she could do. I would probably sleep for the next couple of days and neither of us had any luggage. It was already in Phoenix with her heart meds. She had to go home but her mothering/nursing instincts had kicked in and she didn’t want to leave. Finally common sense prevailed  and reluctantly she made the morning flight. And I went back to sleep.

IMG_4118Two days later I decided I could make the flight (that darned stoic attitude is NUTS) and the WH arranged my travel back to Phoenix. They were so nice, worried about my condition and eager to help in any way they could. Nothing to do except watch me sleep until Saturday afternoon when I caught that same flight from the same gate. I was wheeled to the front door by the nicest nurses on the planet and I was on my way to the airport.

That five hour flight seemed like ten. The lady next to me was traveling with her very anxious cat who was yowling at the top of his lungs. She kept apologizing, but I said not to worry. The cat sounded like I felt. When we took off, everyone including the cat settled down and I thought about the last week. Imagine, one day in the White House and the next in the hospital, an unforgettable ending to an unforgettable trip.

Now you’re probably wondering how all this happened. Why did the White House call me? I’ve saved that for the final episode next. . .

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Did I mention it was a frantic week? The normal meetings that begin a new year were coupled with those daily logistical calls from ID Unknown. Now I looked forward to them.  I admit, it was fun to say, “I’ve got to take this; it’s the White House.” They wanted a bio and a headshot. Sure I can do a bio for the WH. I’m a writer. Full disclosure, waste of time. They took mine and then wrote one that was infinitely better.

I also got calls from  Wanda, a very professional and understanding woman with another government agency, about travel arrangements. It’s a five hour flight to Washington from Phoenix plus the time difference. Dianne and I  would leave on Monday morning and return to Phoenix Wednesday night. They would arrange hotel, transfers, etc. And to answer your question, no, we did not travel first class.

Then there were things like getting my twenty five year old winter coat cleaned. Not much need for coats in Phoenix so it’s in really good shape. It’s freezing in DC so time to get it out. Then just to complicate things, I was nauseated all week with occasional vomiting. You know how it is when you throw up and then feel better? I never felt better, so I just chalked it off to nerves. But why? I’d served seven years in prison. Why would I be nervous about the WH? All this nausea was annoying. I wanted to enjoy this, not feel sick.

When the WH made the official announcement on Saturday, (First Lady’s guest at SOTU) the phone started ringing and my email jumped exponentially. The WH had warned me that this would be fifteen minutes of fame and to be prepared, not only for the media requests and congratulatory wishes but the negative, “Who do you think you are?” comments. Ex-prisoners get a lot of that.

First there was the WH exclusive with BuzzFeed.  Then I did some local interviews, trying to look fresh and excited (which I was) while trying not to look sick and nauseous (which I also was). The AZ Republic made me sound and look excited without the nausea. AZ Central Story And Channel 12, the local NBC affiliate did a twenty-five minute interview that was edited down to about sixty seconds. (That’s quite a talent.)

Finally it was time to pack and try to sleep. I hadn’t slept all week so why start now? The only time I’m actually good with a list is when I travel so I kept checking things off and when it was time to leave for the airport I was actually ready.

Dianne and I flew out on Monday morning and the excitement started at the airport. As we were checking in, I noticed a group of our Arizona Republican legislators standing together waiting for the flight. I told Dianne we should go over and introduce ourselves. After all, we were all going to the same place, sort of.

Hi, I’m Sue Ellen Allen and I’m … before I could finish, Congressman Matt Salmon piped in. “I recognize you from the paper. You’re going to SOTU.” He added that he was good friends with Judge Cecil Ash who has been a strong supporter of Gina’s Team since the beginning. It was a nice start to our journey.

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Dianne and I took the requisite selfie and posted it on FB. I can’t remember posting anything else that week; it’s a blur. Full disclosure, it takes me about 8 minutes to write a Tweet because I was an English major and I loath bad punctuation. I just cannot write R for ARE. Likewise I’m always editing my FB posts for spelling and punctuation. Instagram would not be instant with me.

In DC, we were met at the airport as promised and taken to the Sofitel, attractive, French, close to the WH, lovely room with a view and great French food. We went down for dinner our first night but I was still nauseous so I chose a very simple crepe. It was delicious but didn’t sit well on my stomach and when we went upstairs, I made it to the bathroom just in time. I love French food; this is worrisome. What is wrong with me?

The next morning I was still queasy so we decided to have room service. Oatmeal sounded best  and I think along with the oatmeal I ingested a lot of adrenalin because that kept me going all day.

The WH is big on logistics. I got a schedule for everything. First, a meeting with my press representative from the White House press office. An interview with AP and NBC on the WH lawn. Later, a meeting with the Attorney General, Loretta Lynch. (But I’m an ex-felon.) The next day, a meeting with Senior Presidential Advisor Valerie Jarrett’s team. I got a color coded map and directions and somehow still managed to be late. I HATE TO BE LATE. But even in DC, taxi cab drivers aren’t used to passengers telling them to take them to the east gate of the WH. And you can’t just drive up there. You have to be dropped off at strategic locations and walk. And yes, it was freezing.

After gasping our way across Lafayette Square in the bone-chilling wind, Dianne and I arrived at the WH press gate late. One doesn’t just waltz in to the WH. There are several layers of security to pass, all manned by serious looking and very attractive young men in fantastic shape. I wouldn’t want to cross them. Finally we walked up the WH driveway past a row of green awning press sections where the media hangs out. They call it Pebble Beach. Inside, the waiting room for the press office is appropriately decorated in 19th century American motif and has another attractive young man to check us. This was coupled with serious looking Marines, there especially because the President was in residence that day.

Each of the twenty-three guests invited to sit in the First Lady’s box had been assigned a press IMG_3916representative. I was most fortunate to have Hannah, another very attractive woman who looked young but had incredible media experience. (Why are they all so young and good looking? Probably because I’m seventy! Everybody’s young and attractive.) Hannah took me out to “Pebble Beach” for a quick interview with a very nice man from Associated Press and then another with a lovely woman from NBC. It was all a blur and I haven’t a clue what I actually said. Hannah didn’t seem to think I’d disgraced myself.

As I was waiting for camera set up, Rachel Maddow IMG_3910walked by from MSNBC. Oh my goodness. I’m a huge fan and my late husband David adored her. He never missed a show. So instead of saying something intelligent to her, I gushed over what a big fan David was. She reminded me that she was a big proponent of criminal justice reform and had a background in the issue. It was my entrée to a longer conversation but I was star struck. Rachel, if you read this, can we have coffee and talk about prison? …

Stay tuned for Part 3

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Part 1:
NEVER would I expect to say that; NOT a passing thought on my list of goals. But Sunday night, January 3rd at 7:33 my phone rang. ID unknown. I ignored it. They called again. Then again and left a message. “Ms. Allen, this is  XYZ at the White House calling. My number is blahblahblah. Would you please call me back at your earliest convenience?” Of course, like the movies, my first, second and third thoughts were, it’s a joke. So I Googled the White House and called the operator. After I identified myself, I asked her if this person and number indeed belonged to the White House, or the WH as they refer to it. “Yes, that is one of our staffers.” Oh my goodness. OH MY GOODNESS. I guess I’d better call back.

This nice young man (everyone is young to me) Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 11.01.26 AMfirst thanked me for my prison work. Nice, I thought, but get on with it. Why are you calling me? “I’m calling to invite you to be a guest of the First Lady in her box at the State of The Union address on January 12th.”

Yes, my entire life flashed before me. “Seriously? SERIOUSLY” He laughed, assuring me he was quite serious. “But you know I’m an ex-felon?” Again, he assured me they knew all about me. Yes, I guess they do.

He was actually politely waiting for me to accept and bring a guest, all at the WH’s expense. Yes, YES of course I’ll come and I’ll invite Gina’s mother Dianne as my Plus 1. We had a nice chat about our work at Gina’s Team and what President Obama would like to accomplish in criminal justice in his last year in office. He told me I was sworn to secrecy until the WH announced the list of guests. No Facebooking, Tweeting, etc. I agreed and then I calmly told him I had to go because Downton Abbey was starting and I couldn’t miss it. (Good grief, who hangs up on the WH?)  He assured me he was also a fan and hated to miss it but he had more calls to make. The best part of his job was making these calls.

Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 11.06.08 AMI then calmly proceeded to watch the first episode of Downton  and then I called Dianne to invite her. After she stopped stammering, she proceeded to give me all the reasons why she couldn’t come with me. Hates to travel; nothing to wear; has a root canal scheduled for Monday and a mammogram on Tuesday; and of course, nothing to wear.

“Gosh, Dianne, let me see: White House – Root canal; White House – Mammogram. Which one sounds better?!  Are you kidding me???

Sheepishly she said she’d love to go with me and we started to giggle. It was going to be a great trip.

I spent the week ransacking my closet. What to wear to the WH and SOTU? I researched the previous SOTU pictures of the First Lady’s box and I got some history. This tradition actually started with Ronald Regan and has gained prominence as the media got hungrier. There are plenty of pictures of the guests. Mostly they are dressed in black, with the first ladies in some lovely color. OK, so I need to find color in my closet. Black slacks, of course. It’s cold in DC and I’m not dealing with a skirt. I started pulling jackets out. That’s pretty much my wardrobe, black slacks and colorful jackets, all designer labels from thrift stores. I try to keep the price tag under $15.

After lots of trying on, I settled on a turquoise silk Kasper jacket with black lapels. Yes, from a thrift shop. I thought the color was good and I planned to wear a special pin that would look good on that lapel.

Almost twenty-five years ago when I had a fashion jewelry company named for me, we were commissioned by the Congressional Club to designIMG_4169 a pin for First Lady Barbara Bush to commemorate A Thousand Points of Light, celebrating volunteerism in America. We were invited to Washington where we had a VIP tour of the White House; then we were special guests at the Congressional Club annual VIP luncheon honoring Mrs. Bush where she was presented with the pin I designed. Additionally, every guest received a smaller version to remember the day.

In a story as long and complicated as my life’s journey, a year later  we lost our company in a hostile take over, were indicted for securities fraud and my road turned into Perryville Prison in Goodyear, Arizona, where this story begins. I had gone from the White House to prison where I met Gina and so many others.

Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 11.23.51 AMI served seven years, the longest and darkest of my life. On March 18, 2009 I walked freely back into the world, blessed to have the support of generous friends. My vision was Gina’s Team, an organization that would help the women I left behind and all the other women in prisons everywhere.  Gina’s parents and I co-founded it; started with nothing and built a prison program to remarkable success teaching leadership based on the ATHENA Leadership Model.

But honestly, we were also working on air and adrenalin. Prison work isn’t a popular cause so donations are always a challenge. I worked without salary and we had a devoted staffer who worked part time for minimum wage. We had enough work for a team of people and juggled as fast as we could. We were looking for ways to expand but couldn’t see how.  And then the White House called…

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With apologies to all whom I did not understand. Let us not be defined by pain. Let us be redefined by love.   _Sue Ellen

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Before you died
You made sure I knew how to make the coffee.
You always made the coffee.
Everyone loved it.
It was delicious.

Yesterday I made the coffee.
This morning I looked forward to a cup.
I took the pitcher from the fridge
and watched as it slipped through my fingers
and smashed to the floor
into a million jagged shards.
Sticky coffee and shiny shards all over the floor.
Cleanedandcleanedandcleaned
Barefoot
Moppedandmoppedandmopped
Barefoot
Vacuumed for the last sparklysticky pieces
Barefoot

Suddenly I got it.

I hurt so bad
I wanted to step on a sharp shard
I wanted to slash my foot
I wanted to see the bright red blood
I wanted to feel the pain
I hurt so bad
I wanted anything to relieve the pain…
This worse than prison
worse than heartbreak
worse than loneliness
worse than anyanyany other pain.

I GOT IT.
The Cutting.

I know cutters.
They cut to relieve the pain.
I never understood but I do now.

SlashBleedRelease, SlashBleedRelease, SlashBleedRelease
That’s what they feel.
I GET IT.
ThePainThePainThePainThePainThePainThePain

Anything to relieve the pain.
Anything
Anything to relieve the pain…

May we all feel relief.
May we all feel hope.
May we all feel the compassion
of understanding.
May we be redefined by love.

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After hospital and emergency surgery, I have spent the month at a much slower pace, trying to recuperate. “Rest,” my doctor said. Easy for her to say, but there were some things too important to put on the back burner, namely ATHENA.

This takes some background info. Last year through divine providence I met MarthaMertz, the founder of ATHENA International (http://www.athenainternational.org/). Twenty-eight years ago, Martha had a vision about women and leadership. I highly recommend you read her book, Becoming ATHENA, for the history of her very important journey. It is powerful, intelligent, and inspiring.

On her quest to learn how women lead, Martha realized that women use eight principles for leadership. When I read her book, I “got it” immediately and thought, “These are rules for all of us to live by. These would be wonderful taught at the prison.” I asked Martha if she would like to go to prison to do a program for Gina’s Team, our organization that brings educational programs into prisons and juvenile facilities.  That request is usually greeted by stunned silence, but Martha also “got it.” She immediately said, “Yes.”

So last December, Martha went to Perryville Prison in Goodyear, AZ for Gina’s Team to conduct an “ATHENA World Café” to introduce the women in prison to these principles. Here they are:

 The ATHENA Leadership Model*

Live Authentically. Being true to yourself. An inner clarity centers in core beliefs, grounded in ethics, and honed through reflection. A sense of purpose, pursued with integrity. Authenticity is the single most important quality of leadership. Leaders know their values and remain true to them.

Learn Constantly. Continuous development of skills and competencies, regardless of your level of achievement. Understanding built on experience, intuition and self-directed learning. The art of listening; the ability to learn from role models, bad as well as good. Leaders seek knowledge.

Advocate Fiercely. Passionate, personal devotion to something that deeply matters. Acting with unswerving commitment tempered by respect and compassion. Generating a powerful force for good. Leaders champion what they believe is right.

Act Courageously. The willingness to stand alone and speak the truth, to question assumptions or challenge the status quo. The determination to act honorably, consistent with your values, even in the face of fear or loss. Leaders dare.

Foster Collaboration. Valuing the gifts each individual brings, with a perspective that is global and a spirit that is inclusive. Deepening understanding, awareness, and knowledge through diversity. Encouraging participation from those who are often overlooked. Leaders welcome others to the work of leadership.

Build relationships. Connecting genuinely with those around you. A willingness to bond with others, profoundly and productively, with trust and respect; to reach beyond status and self-interest in search of meaningful connections. Leaders engage, empower, and trust.

Give Back. Leaving a worthy legacy for your community and the world. Recognizing that with success comes a responsibility to enrich the lives of others. Generously devoting voice, position, and resources to advance the greater good. Leaders serve.

Celebrate. The age-old practice of gathering to mark important times. Strengthening bonds of unity through creative expression, rituals and traditions. Memorializing moments, triumphant or tragic; sharing joyful or solemn reflection. Leaders remember and rejoice.

The women in prison also “got it.” The feedback was overwhelmingly enthusiastic. We then went to prison officials to see if we could teach it as a continuing program.  We were delighted when the answer was Yes. And so Martha’s new journey began. She has taught ATHENA Leadership in China, India, Dubai, and all over Europe and the United States, always to women who already have a measure of success and education. This would be the first time in prison where 50% of all inmates enter with less than an eighth grade education.  Rarely do they think of themselves as leaders and for some, this could very well be a paradigm shift.

Martha didn’t want to teach this alone. She wanted to team teach with me. I was thrilled and deeply honored. As a former prisoner, there is no doubt I have an “inside knowledge” of how things run as well as what inmates’ expectations are.  However, since I am a former inmate, we had to get special permission for me to be allowed back in to teach this class and are grateful that the administration shared Martha’s vision and decided to allow it. Once all this was accomplished and class schedules were set, we attacked the curriculum. Our first class was June 23.

Research done. Curriculum completed. Handouts copied.  All very professional. We are ready. But we are women and so we also had another serious conversation, “What are we going to wear?” There are lots of rules, beginning with no orange (no problem for me), no brown or khaki, no low-cut or sleeveless tops, no short skirts, no excessive jewelry. But I do know that inmates are starved for color so I always recommend that to our volunteers. Finally we really are ready.

 To be continued…

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Our little grass roots organization started in 2009 when I was released from prison. Gina’s parents Chris and Diane waited for my release to start Gina’s Team, the dream we shared after Gina’s death in 2003. Thanks to the kindness and shared passion of others, the dream has grown and flourished. Our belief that “Education, not incarceration, is the cheapest form of crime prevention” is taking hold and we are grateful for our board, our advisory board and all our volunteers. YOU make a difference.

Recently I got a call from Channel 3, Arizona’s Family. They were interested in doing a story. I was thrilled to be able to shine some attention on all the volunteers who work to make our dream a reality. Thanks to Channel 3 and Brandy for creating such a terrific message for us. Here is the link to the story.

http://www.azfamily.com/news/Ginas-Team-122374394.html

To add to our celebration, we have a new logo, thanks to the brilliant and creative AlexLadinsinsky.

   GT Logo

Unfortunately I don’t know how to wave the magic blog wand and poof the real picture into my blog like the rest of my blogger friends do. You’ll have to click on the pdf  file to open it and hopefully oooh and ahhh. We really like it. Gina’s favorite flower was the sunflower. This represents hope behind the wires with the leaf growing through the wire in spite of everything. We are ever hopeful.

May you never lose hope and continue to make a positive difference in the worl…inside or out. Let me know how your passion is manifesting as you make a difference. Thanks.

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Vanity prevents me from posting a picture of me, exhausted and feeling guilty because I haven’t written in my blog since May 9.  So why didn’t I? Purpose and passion in the name ofGina’s Team. Our little grass roots organization is growing faster than the oncoming bullet train. I am sure Gina is leading a team of angels to provide the miracles that come our way.

I decided the best thing would be to share our activities and the amazing people who are helping us so here is an encapsulated version with a picture of our team: 

 

 

 

 

Perryville Prison. April program: Control, Assault, Delete, a powerful play on domestic violence by Linda & John King. Please check out their website http://www.helpfixthehurt.org/  These two incredibly brave parents lost their beautiful daughter to a brutal act of domestic violence. They have turned their pain into power, impacting lives with their passion to help others. 

Mingus Mountain Academy.  April program: Olympic Gold Medalist Misty Hyman went up the mountain with us to speak to these 12 to 18 year old girls about the importance of setting goals as they rebuild their lives. Mistyand her Valley Leadership cohort presented each girl with a journal to record her goals. Arizona’s Family Channel 3 accompanied us to film a story on Gina’s Team and our activities. http://www.azfamily.com/news/Ginas-Team-122374394.html  Thanks, Channel 3, Brandy and Mike for such a positive story.

Mingus. May program:  Author and speaker Vickie Mullins spoke to the girls about rebuilding lives with positve memories. Through the generosity of Mingus and Vickie, each girl received a copy of Vickie’s book, I Want You To Know Me…Love, Me. Her website, http://iwantyoutoknowme.com/, explains who the death of a young friend provided  the inspiration behind this book that has impacted so many lives. You may want a copy yourself for someone you love. 

Estrella Jail program: Gina’s Team has made two trips to the jail to visit some of the women there with a positive message of hope. We are grateful for the opportunity. 

ASU students from a class in the College of Social Transformation held two very successful events to promote awareness about incarceration in America. Gina’s Team worked with them the entire semester to formulate these successful events. We are so impressed with their desire to impact change in their communities. This is a powerful generation. 

Gina’s Team partnered with the National Advocacy and Training Network   (http://www.natn-az.com/home) to train volunteers for our new program called Welcome Home, designed to assist women newly released from prison as they seek to successfully reenter our communities. We are blessed with a group of enthusiastic and deeply committed volunteers. 

Gina’s Team has been involved in several events at the ASU Art Museum’s recent art experience about incarceration entitled “It’s Not Just Black & White.” http://asuartmuseum.asu.edu/exhibitions/viewevent.php?eid=824  After a  powerful three month long event, we were crushed to see the black and white stripes disappear and the wall come down in May. Gregory Sale’s vision cast a spotlight on incarceration in a unique and meaningful way. 

After nine months of class, I was part of the graduating class of the ASU GenNext Nonprofit Academy. Thanks to ASU for awarding me a scholarship to be a part of this incredible experience. In prison I missed the opportunity for the intellectual challenge that ASU provides in so many ways to our community. Budget cuts to education are a serious mistake in our state. 

After a great deal of dreaming and planning, Gina’s Team has received permission from the Department of Corrections to start several new programs inside the prisons. 

1. Kingian Nonviolence. Behind the wires violence is too often a way of life. We are introducing this course to the teens in the minor’s unit in Tucson.  We are grateful for this opportunity to teach young men an alternative to violence. http://phoenixnonviolence.org/ 

 2. ATHENA Leadership. Martha Mertz, author of Becoming Athena and founder of the internationally acclaimed Athena International  award (http://www.athenainternational.org/) is taking her expertise behind the wires to Perryville. After speaking there in December, she realized this was a place that would benefit from the eight principle of leadership highlighted in her book. These eight principles are simple rules for living.  They are:

Live Authentically                   Learn Constantly                             Advocate Fiercely

Act Courageously                    Foster Collaboration                       Build relationships

Give Back                                       Celebrate

Gina’s Team is proud to bring Martha and her wisdom to the women of Perryville. 

3. Parenting. Many of the women at Perryville are mothers who miss their children desperately. Learning to be a better parent is a key to successful reentry and reconciliation. Gina’s Team is bringing Parenting Arizona to Perryville to teach classes in this important life skill. 

We are also partnering with Jeanne Robinson and Jessica’s Operation Orange to bring precious books to all the prisons in AZ as well as more juvenile facilities. Please check out www.jessicasoperationorange.com for information about how one all too common mistake can change so many lives. The inspiration lies in how Jessica and her parents have turned their pain into power, helping others through her tragedy. Jessica’s mother  Jeanne  is a force of nature, impacting lives in such positive ways. 

Turn your pain into power. That’s what all this is about. I know that we are alive to help others. The best way is through the wisdom we gain when we survive a tragedy. That’s what my motto is all about. 

                                Been there. Done that. Now how can I help? 

Find your passion and  purpose. It will enrich your life in ways you cannot imagine. I promise.

 

 

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